Experience Gaming Like Never Before

Unparallel Gaming Experience

Withdraw Your Winnings

Badugi Poker Tournaments & offers

Download Big Cash App

  • download bigcash app
  • download bigcash app
  • download bigcash app

Currently supported on Android 4.4 and above

The BIG CASH App is 100% safe & secure

Learn to Play Badugi Poker Online

Learn to Play Badugi Poker Online

Introduction To Badugi Poker

Badugi Poker is a unique and relatively less common variant of poker that originated in Asia, particularly in South Korea. It is characterized by its distinct hand ranking system and the goal of creating the lowest possible hand with unique suits and ranks. Badugi is a draw poker game that involves multiple betting rounds and strategic decision-making. 

The objective of Badugi Poker is to have the best four-card hand with different suits and ranks, with the lowest possible combination being the best hand. Straights and flushes are not considered in hand rankings.

Play Badugi Poker & Earn Real Money

Badugi is a unique and intriguing variant of poker that involves creating the lowest possible hand with unique suits and ranks. Here's a step-by-step guide on how to play Badugi:

The objective of Badugi Poker:

The objective of Badugi is to have the best four-card hand with distinct suits and ranks, aiming for the lowest possible hand.

Setup of Badugi Poker:

1. Ante: Each player places an initial bet, known as the "ante," to start the round. The ante creates the initial pot for the hand.

2. Card Dealing: Each player is dealt four private cards face-down.

Betting Rounds in Badugi Poker:

3. First Betting Round: Starting with the player to the left of the dealer, there's a round of betting. Players can fold (discard their cards and forfeit the pot), call (match the current bet), or raise (increase the bet) based on their hand strength.

Drawing Phases and Betting Rounds in Badugi Poker:

4. First Drawing Phase: After the first betting round, players have the option to exchange (draw) zero to four of their cards in an attempt to improve their hand. The goal is to discard higher-ranking cards and keep or draw lower-ranking cards to form a Badugi hand.

5. Second Betting Round: After the first drawing phase, there's another round of betting. Players can fold, call, or raise based on their hand's potential.

6. Second Drawing Phase: Similar to the first drawing phase, players who are still in the hand and want to exchange cards participate in another drawing phase.

7. Third Betting Round: After the second drawing phase, there's a third round of betting. Players can continue to fold, call, or raise.

8. Final Drawing Phase: Like the previous rounds, players who are still in the hand and want to exchange cards can participate in the final drawing phase.

Final Betting Round and Showdown in Badugi Poker:

9. Final Betting Round: After the final drawing phase, there's a final round of betting. Players can make their last bets based on their hand's potential.

10. Showdown: If there are two or more players remaining after the final betting round, there's a showdown. Players reveal their hands, and the player with the best Badugi hand wins the pot. 

In Badugi, hand rankings are determined by the number of cards, the suits, and the ranks. The best hand is a "Badugi," which is a four-card hand with all different suits and ranks. If no player has a Badugi, the hand with the fewest cards and the lowest ranks and suits wins. Pairs and cards of the same suit are penalized in the hand rankings.

Badugi hand rankings follow this order (from best to worst):

1. Badugi (four cards of different suits and ranks): 

A Badugi is the best hand you can have in Badugi. It consists of four cards with unique ranks and suits. For example, 2♠ 4♦ 6♥ 7♣ would be a strong Badugi hand.

2. Three-card hand (called a "Three-Card" or "Triple")

If you can't form a Badugi, the next best hand is a three-card hand. This hand consists of three cards of different ranks and suits. For example, 2♠ 4♦ 6♥ would be a three-card hand.

3. Two-card hand (called a "Two-Card" or "Double")

If you can't form a Badugi or a three-card hand, the next best is a two-card hand. This hand consists of two cards of different ranks and suits. For example, 2♠ 4♦ would be a two-card hand.

4. One-card hand (called a "One-Card" or "Single")

If you can't form a Badugi, a three-card hand, or a two-card hand, the lowest hand is a one-card hand. This hand consists of one card. For example, 2♠ would be a one-card hand.

Note: Pairs are penalized in Badugi, and having cards of the same suit reduces the value of your hand. For example, if you have two cards of the same rank but different suits, it's still a two-card hand. However, if those two cards are of the same suit, it's a one-card hand. 

Remember that the goal is to have the lowest possible hand with unique suits and ranks, and straights and flushes are not considered in the hand rankings.

Badugi Poker offers a different kind of challenge compared to traditional poker variants. It requires players to think strategically about both discarding and drawing cards to form the best possible low hand.

In Badugi, your opening hand range refers to the type of starting hands you should consider playing during the initial stages of the game. Since the goal is to create a Badugi hand with low ranks and different suits, your opening range should focus on hands that have the potential to become strong Badugis. 

Strong Opening Hands:

1. Four Low, Different-Suited Cards: Look for hands with four cards of different suits and low ranks. This gives you the potential to build a strong Badugi hand.

2. Three Low Cards: If you have three low-ranking cards of different suits, you might consider playing these hands. The goal is to draw a fourth card that is also low and of a different suit.

3. Pairs or High Cards: While pairs and high cards are generally not preferred in Badugi, if you have a pair of low cards (e.g., 2-2-7-Q), you might still consider playing in hopes of drawing two more low cards.

Marginal Opening Hands:

Three Low Cards of the Same Suit: If you have three low cards of the same suit, it might be tempting to play, but be cautious. These hands can lead to flushes or three-card hands, which are not strong Badugis.

Weak Opening Hands:

High Cards or Pairs: Hands with high cards or pairs should generally be avoided as opening hands. These hands have limited potential to form strong Badugis.

In Badugi, starting with a three-card hand is generally considered weaker than starting with a four-card hand. However, there are situations where playing a three-card hand might be reasonable, especially if the cards have the potential to improve into a strong Badugi. 

1. Three Low, Different-Suited Cards:

If you have three low-ranking cards of different suits, you have the potential to form a Badugi hand. For example, 2-3-5 of different suits can be a promising starting hand. These hands have the potential to improve with the right draws.

2. One Pair with a Low Third Card:

In some cases, a three-card hand with a pair and a low third card can be considered playable. For instance, 2-2-7 or 3-3-8 could be played with the hope of drawing two more low cards.

3. Avoid High Cards and Suitedness:

Avoid playing three-card hands with high-ranking cards or cards of the same suit. High cards reduce your chances of forming a Badugi, and suitedness can lead to flushes instead of strong Badugis.

4. Consider Position and Opponent Actions:

Your position at the table and your opponent's actions should influence your decision to play a three-card hand. If you're in an early position, playing these hands might be riskier. If your opponents are playing conservatively, you might find opportunities to play more hands.

5. Be Prepared to Fold:

Be ready to fold your three-card hand if it doesn't show potential to form a Badugi as the hand progresses. Remember that forming a Badugi with a three-card hand requires drawing two specific low-ranking, different-suited cards.

1. Two Low, Different-Suited Cards:

If you have two low-ranking cards of different suits, there's a very slim chance of forming a Badugi, but it's not impossible. For example, 2-4 different suits could be played if you're in a favourable position and your opponents' actions are cautious.

2. Low Pair with a Low Third Card:

A two-card hand with a pair and a low third card might be considered if you believe you can draw two low cards of different suits.

3. Extremely Situational:

Playing a two-card Badugi hand is extremely situational and should be approached with caution. Only consider playing such a hand if you're in a late position, your opponents are playing conservatively, and you believe the right cards are likely to come in the draws.

4. Be Prepared to Fold:

Keep in mind that starting with a two-card hand is risky, and you should be prepared to fold if the hand doesn't develop as you hope in the following betting rounds and drawing phases.

5. Factor in Position and Opponent Actions:

Position and your opponents' actions are crucial when deciding whether to play a two-card hand. Being in a late position gives you more information to work with, and cautious opponents might give you the opportunity to play more hands.

1. How is Badugi different from other poker games?

Badugi differs in hand rankings, where the goal is to form a Badugi hand with low-ranking, different-suited cards. Pairs and suited cards are penalized in Badugi.

2. What is a Badugi hand?

A Badugi hand consists of four cards with unique ranks and suits. It is the best possible hand in Badugi.

3. Can I have a flush or straight in Badugi?

No, flushes and straights are not considered in Badugi hand rankings. The focus is solely on unique suits and ranks.

4. How many times can I draw cards in Badugi?

In Badugi, you have up to three drawing rounds to exchange cards and improve your hand.

5. Is bluffing important in Badugi?

Bluffing is still a strategic element in Badugi, especially if your opponents show weakness. However, since players aim for low hands, bluffing has a unique dynamic.

6. Can I play Badugi online?

Yes, many online poker platforms offer Badugi as one of their variants. You can play against other players or AI opponents, depending on the platform.

7. Is Badugi a game of skill or luck?

Badugi is a combination of skill and luck. Skill is needed to assess hand potential, make strategic draws, and read opponents. Luck plays a role in the cards dealt and drawn.